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Vocanoes




Kilauea is the youngest and southeastern most volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. Topographically Kilauea appears as only a bulge on the southeastern flank of Mauna Loa, and so for many years Kilauea was thought to be a mere satellite of its giant neighbor, not a separate volcano. However, research over the past few decades shows clearly that Kilauea has its own magma-plumbing system, extending to the surface from more than 60 km deep in the earth.

Hawaiian Meaning
The Hawaiian name "Kilauea" means "spewing" or "much spreading," apparently in reference to the lava flows that it erupts. Eruptions have been Continuous since January 3, 1983. It is estimated that the first eruption of Kilauea
has between 300,000 and 600,000 years ago.


Volcano Resources
 
Explore a Virtual Volcano:
Discovery Channel


Volcanoes are pressure valves that release energy from deep within Earth.  Beautiful and powerful, awe-inspiring and deadly, the are spectacular reminders of the dynamic forces that continually shape our planet.
 
Forces of Nature: Volcanoes
National Geographic


First Tab: Tornadoes
Second Tab: Volcanoes
Third Tab: Hurricanes
Fourth Tab: Earthquakes

Once on the Volcanoes tab, there is a shortcut to build your own Volcano

 
 
Create and customize your own fire-spewing giant and watch it erupt.
 
Photo Gallery:
The Wrath of a Volcano


Have you ever been this close to a Volcano?
 
Cascade Range Volcanoes
Vancouver, Washington
 
Volcano Types
From NASA
 
The Anatomy of a Volcano

From PBS
 
Volcano Under the City
From PBS


A restless mountain threatens a bustling metropolis perched on its flanks.
 
Deadly Volcanoes
Explore some of the worst Volcanic disasters ever

 
 
Volcano Above the Clouds

Join an expedition to the glacier-capped summit of Kilimanjaro, Africa's tallest mountain
 
How and Where Volcanoes Erupt
What causes volcanic eruptions?

From MS NBC
 
Volcanoes
From CBS News

A Look Inside
Volcanoes Around the World
Mount St. Helens 2004
Mount St. Helens 1980
Mount Etna Erupts


 
Mount St. Helens

Rebirth of a Blast Zone

See Mount St. Helens today

From National Geographic